Hot Rum and Sweet Butter

I just got in from shoveling snow drifts in the bitter cold.  Hot rum and sweet butter warmed me up like nothing else.  First, here is where the idea came, from a simpler time – a simpler recipe, thanks to David Wondrich’s research.

Authentic, Pure & Simple Hot Buttered Rum
2 sugar cubes (2 teaspoons)
hot water
2 ounces dark rum
pat of butter

In a pre-warmed mug, dissolve the sugar in a little hot water, then add the rum and unsalted butter. Fill the mug with hot water.

No extra flavors, just silky warm rum.  It’s so good.  I think he even says if we want to sprinkle a little nutmeg on top, we can; but he doesn’t.  I’ve tried both ways – both are good.  Both are astonishingly luxurious.  But I’m going to have to agree with Mr. Wondrich on the purity of less.  If you have not tried this, please stop putting it off and sip one of these soothing drinks – like a hot bath with a bowl of soup – so thorough in how it eases the cares of the world away.  I would have written this post solely about this recipe, except wanted to experiment, something with spices, but particularly with orange.  In fact, before you make my recipe, make the original, and sip on it as you make mine.  I honestly do not care if you condemn my recipe, as long as you try the original Hot Buttered Rum.  And please tell people about it – no…better yet, make it for them, and watch them lick their lips.

For my recipe, it is more flavorful to make the batter ahead of time to marry the spices – a couple of hours at least.  Although you do not need to wait a whole day to make this drink, I think flavors need time to work their magic.  Very similar to making hot grog, or chili, or any heated liquid with spices, in most cases it will taste better the next day, and possibly twice as good the day after that.  My loving parents from Florida graciously sent me some wondrously delicious oranges, which only makes this drink better (both the drink itself, and the act of drinking it).  Freshly squeezed oranges work far better than from a carton or concentrate.  Plus, you will need orange zest for the batter as well.  Finally, a lovely and talented co-worker of my wife’s supplied us with tasty Amish butter, a genuine treat in almost all perspectives.  I felt a drink which highlighted butter as a main ingredient should have profound quality (particularly if drinking the original recipe) to get that true butter and rum flavor profile.

Hot Orange Buttered Rum

Hot Orange Buttered Rum
(for 2 drinks)
4 Tbsp room temperature unsalted butter
1/2 cup loosely packed light brown sugar
1/2 tsp cinnamon
1/2 tsp nutmeg
1/4 tsp allspice
1 tsp vanilla extract
1 tsp finely grated orange zest
2 cups freshly squeezed orange juice
2 cups water
4 oz dark rum (Myers's)
2 cinnamon sticks

For the batter:  Beat butter, sugar, cinnamon, nutmeg, allspice and orange zest on high-speed with a hand mixer until thoroughly combined – 1 to 1 1/2 minutes.  Refrigerate in an airtight container, or put it in your freezer (lasts 2 weeks maximum).

For the drink:  Warm two heatproof glasses or mugs with boiling water.  Warm the orange juice with the water in a medium saucepan until very hot, but not boiling.  Discard water from warm mugs.  Scoop 2 separate heaping teaspoons of batter, allowing a few minutes to come to room temperature, especially if the batter was stored in the freezer, and place in mugs.  Pour 2 ounces of dark rum into each glass, then top with the hot orangey water.  Garnish with a cinnamon stick each, stirring until the batter dissolves to reveal all those flavors.  The melted butter will rise to the surface, even though the batter does not float.

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God Jul!

God Jul!  For those of you who do not speak Swedish (like me – even though I’m Swedish-American), it means Merry Christmas.  Pertaining to the approach of Christmas, not “the holiday season” since it does not have anything to do with Thanksgiving or New Years, this drink is like drinking Christmas Spirit.  However, this is how I see it, or from my perspective growing up with one of many traditions.  We called it “grog” in pronunciation, even though it should have been pronounced “wassail.”  It was my grandmother’s recipe, and meant to be non-alcoholic – no wine, no brandy, and certainly no rum.  Yet rum made its way in, only after it was done brewing all day, and resting through the night to be ready to drink the next day.  Whether a Christmas party, or merely to drink a bit of happiness into your life, we’d put the wonderment into a big, coffee maker with a spigot to warm it back up, and a bottle of rum nearby for the adults.  As a boy I never could see any reason to change what was perfect.

What we made was wassail, a hot mulled cider (Old English wæs hæl, literally ‘be you healthy’ – an ancient southern English ritual intended to ensure a plentiful cider apple harvest for the next year.  The term wassail was meant for both drink and toasting).  Regardless, we didn’t call it that.  We called it grog.  When looking up various recipes for grog, or glögg in Swedish, I quickly found out several missing ingredients.

Glögg, pronounced somewhat like glooog (roughly translated: “glow”), is a sweet, high-octane, mulled wine.  According to the Wine & Spirits Museum in Stockholm, King Gustav I of Sweden was fond of a drink made from German wine, sugar, honey, cinnamon, ginger, cardamom and cloves. It was later named “glödgad vin” in 1609, which meant “glowing-hot wine.” The word glögg is a shortened form that first appeared in print in 1870.

There are several recipes I am fond of, all which include various fruits, either sweet red wine or port, or both, and all with fortifying spirits.  Here’s a Swedish glögg recipe:

2 bottles sweet red wine
2 cups water
1 1/2 oz dark rum (with this I prefer Gosling's)
1 1/2 oz brandy (doesn't need to be expensive with so many flavors)
1 1/2 oz port wine
10 dried prunes
4 pieces dried apricots
4 pieces dried apples
1/2 cup golden raisins
1/2 cup dark raisins
2 oranges (washed and sliced)
rind of 1/3 of a lime (no pith - either peeled or grated)
1/2 cup dried cranberries 
1/4 cup pistachios (should be almonds, but allergic to)
2 Tbsp whole cloves
1 tsp cardamom pods
4 (3 inch) cinnamon sticks
1 cup brown sugar (light)

Bind up cinnamon, cardamom, cloves and lime rind in cheesecloth.  Bring all ingredients, except alcohol and wine, to near boil (do not boil) and simmer for at least one hour, preferably 3 hours.  Remove bound up spice packet.  Add remaining ingredients only minutes before serving, reheating to near boil (again, do not boil).  Serve in heatproof glass cups (so you can see inside – this Christmas gift comes with see-through wrappings), adding a small helping of fruit and nuts to each glass, and a teaspoon to eat by.  Garnish either with an orange peal in the drink, or an orange slice on the rim of the glass.

I know that sounds like a lot of ingredients.  But the idea is richness, deep thought-provoking richness, the kind your most precious memories from Christmas past will conjure.  Also, if you would prefer, I’ve heard of substituting Aquavit (or Akvavit) for the brandy, but not for this precise recipe  This is where I haven’t experimented enough to make this call – maybe if Aquavit is added, maybe the cardamom will seem too powerful.  Sorry for not knowing for sure.

Even though I’m talking about glögg, I’m writing this to show the grog recipe I grew up with, regardless if it’s really wassail.  It’s a simple recipe, easy to make, and so happy and bright with flavor.  You could even use it as an ingredient if making a mulled wine.  I am very proud of this drink, and so glad my parents shared this recipe with me.

glögg

Julglögg (Christmas Grog)
1 quart hot tea (black tea - just use teabags)
2 tsp whole cloves
1/4 cup stick cinnamon
1 gallon apple cider
1 quart orange juice
1 pint grapefruit juice (not ruby red)
1 cup cranberry juice
1 cup sugar
1 cup hot water

Make hot tea by steeping for 5 to 7 minutes.  Meanwhile, bring water to boil and dissolve sugar completely within to make a simple syrup.  Add cloves and cinnamon to tea, bring to a boil and simmer for 10 minutes.  Add cider, orange juice, syrup, grapefruit juice, and cranberry juice.  Bring to boiling point, but do not boil.  Simmer for a few hours.  If you don’t have time, just cover and let it sit all day.  Either way, let it stand overnight to marry the flavors.  Serve hot (but do not boil).  If you’re in the mood, add a splash (or more) of amber rum.  Silver rums feel a little too rough, and spiced rums think they are in charge.  I first thought dark rums would be ideal, instead learning they kind of clash as well.  A list of rums that work:  Appleton, Matusalem, Mount Gay, El Dorado, Pusser’s, and Bacardi.  Due to how more mild it is to any other, Gosling’s is the only dark rum capable for this recipe.  Finally, garnish with a slice of orange with a number of whole cloves poked into the skin, thanks to my loving parents for sending my wife and I a box of delicious Florida oranges.

Merry Christmas to all who read this.  Astonished to see so many people from so many places visit this website, I hope I can be of any help, even if it just means a suggested recipe for an option of what to make with certain flavors.  Thank you one an all.  And for those who do not celebrate Christmas, I wish you a Happy New Year.  Be safe.

POG Punch

Since I am a big fan of both guava and passion fruit, in my investigations I learned of a common combination from Hawai’i, even hearing it is bottled and canned commercially there.  POG is passion fruit, orange, and guava.  I also learned there is a debate whether POG is made with passion fruit or pineapple.  There seems to be more recipes  made with pineapple juice, which makes sense since pineapple is as tropical as you can get, especially when thinking of Hawai’i.  However, passion fruit won as far as accuracy and authenticity.

There are many ratios of the three ingredients to choose from, understandably each is according to their creator’s preference in flavors.  Orange balances, or its citric acid can takeover.  Guava is mellow enough to get lost.  And passion fruit is complex enough to stand on its own in almost any ratio.  The goal balance is to match with the rum, but remembering lime will also get added (I add lime to almost all my tiki drinks – it goes with rum so well).  POG is also meant to be drank all by itself.  It’s so delicious and healthy tasting, I can’t help taking a big swig whenever I’m making any concoction with it (fighting the urge to chug all of it).  Here is my POG recipe.  But please experiment with the ratios to find your own flavor preference.

POG
1/2 measure orange juice
1 measure guava juice
1 measure passion fruit juice

Regarding the ingredients, if you only have syrups, not juices, halve the amount of syrup to juice, as I find syrups are generally twice as strong.  It is not easy to obtain passion fruit or guava juices, even in the organic section of super markets.  I ordered passion fruit juice online (Ceres brand – sounding closest to the true flavor of pure passion fruit, without as much filler to muddle the genuine flavor).  As far as rum is concerned, Appleton has a very pleasing flavor, and goes gratefully well with POG.  Yet I disagree with some that it should not be the only rum flavor in the punch.  I am a big fan of Bajan rums, particularly Mount Gay rums (their entire line of products is excellent).  A light rum from Barbados mixed with a golden Jamaican rum tastes complex enough, but simple enough to appreciate the wondrous flavors of POG.

Lastly, my parents moved to Florida, and were loving enough to show me the wisdom of the local oranges.  I know, you may think, “What’s the difference,” or “is it really that important?”  The difference is bigger than you think, and yes – it is that important.  When Florida oranges are in season, there truly is no better tasting orange on the planet (to me).  They are not pretty to look at, and smaller, unlike the lovely California oranges, which seem less flavorful, regardless if they are more prolific year around.  Of course commercial orange juice will work.  I won’t go into detail about flavorings and preservatives added, merely stating that squeezing a fresh fruit will offer a better genuine flavor.

POG Punch

POG Punch
1 1/2 oz Appleton Estate VX rum
1/2 oz Mount Gay Eclipse rum
1/2 oz fresh lime juice
1/2 oz simple syrup
1/2 oz fresh orange juice
1 oz guava juice
1 oz passion fruit juice

Shake with ice.  Strain into pre-chilled glass half-filled with ice.  Garnish with an orange and lime slice.

And for the record, this is one of my wife’s favorite drinks. However, I make a slightly different recipe for her.  I use only Appleton (totaling 2 oz, and less lime & simple syrup – 1/4 oz each). It is a sweeter drink.  I prefer drinks more sour, and alter her drink accordingly.  After all, drink to your health, and your happiness, right?  The first taste might cause you feel you are on a Hawai’ian beach.